The online conundrum and great advice from Writer Unboxed

The online conundrum–build a web presence. Write–don’t worry about a web presence. You need a website. Not all well-known authors have websites.

Argh.

Over at Writer Unboxed, Jane Friedman writes about the social media conundrum: “The Online Presence That’s a Natural Extension of Who You Are And What You Do, (Is It Just A Fantasy?).”

She writes: “I’ve been reading with interest (and sympathy) the comments on Porter Anderson’s Unboxed post last week, where we see the familiar Sturm und Drang of writers grappling with the demands of online marketing—or how to be publicly communicative and chummy when it’s against our nature, perhaps even against our work.

This has remained a problem for a long time now, hasn’t it?”

Read the rest oft her post.

Also read the comment by Donald Maas.

 

 

 

The Top Ten Reasons Why Writers Make the Best Friends

From the South85 blog:

At the conclusion of an alumni weekend during the Converse College MFA residency, I sat with three friends/colleagues/fellow alum who gathered for one final moment before parting (again) to return to our respective homes after a fun-filled, raucous, inspiring time.

As we reflected on various moments, all of us anticipating and dreading the impending depression that results from returning to the “real world,” the thought for this blog post struck me.

Read the rest of Kathleen Nalley’s South85 blog post here.

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Interested in an MFA program? The deadline to apply to Converse College’s MFA program is October 1st.
Information on limited scholarships and teaching assistanships are available here.

 

 

What writers have on their bedside tables

A fun project from author Shannon Huffman Polson, author of North of Hope. It’s called The Bedside Table Project. Below is the description from Shannon’s site:

Part voyeur, part inspiration, every Monday you get a glimpse into the lives of authors and other thinkers who share a picture of their bedside table, a view into what matters to them right now, the things that inspire them, that occupy their minds.


Connect with Shannon on Twitter, Facebook, and her website.

 

Falling and Flying-South 85 blog

Good writing advice from Jeffrey Schrecongost at the South 85 blog:

Greed. Guilt. God.

The big ones, yes? The ways in which the three interrelate are what I seek to explore in my fiction. People who need more than they need. The pain of remorse. The nature of a faith that comforts some and confuses and disappoints others.

Read the rest of Jeffrey’s post at South 85.

Follow Jeffrey on twitter

Austin Kleon’s “Show Your Work”

Kleon’s Show Your Work

Photo provided by Austin Kleon. showyrwork.com

Photo provided by Austin Kleon. showyrwork.com

Show Your Work 10 Ways to Share Your Creativity and Get Discovered is the follow-up (in my mind) to Kleon’s Steal Like an Artist. You’ve created and now want to share with the world your work–what’s the best way to do that?

Not by becoming “human spam. They’re everywhere, and they exist in every profession. They don’t want to pay their dues, they want their piece right here, right now. They don’t want to listen to your ideas; they want to tell you theirs…At some point, they didn’t get the memo that the world owes none of us anything.” (124). You draw attention to your work by “sharing like an artist:”

https://www.flickr.com/photos/deathtogutenberg/12548712844/in/set-72157641021360663/

Back cover provided by Austin Kleon.
showyrwork.com

As with Steal Like An Artist, Show Your Work is packed with wise advice and clever artwork.

The writing is witty and concise, but also though-provoking. Kleon writes “The trouble with imaginative people is that we’re good at picturing the worst that could happen to us. Fear is often just imagination taking a wrong turn. Bad criticism is not the end of the world” (150-151). That resonated with me when I first read it, and still resonates reading it again. This is one of the reasons why the writing works in this book–Kleon writes it as it is. This book sits on my desk by Steal Like An Artist, easy to get to whenever I need it.

 

Kleon, Austin. Show Your Work. New York:Workman Publishing. 2014. Print.

Literary Citizenship Wants You

from the South85 blog:

“Yes, you. The concept behind literary citizenship is a simple one—become involved in the reading/writing community to support the work of others. It’s not that difficult to do, really. It requires time, but what worthy endeavor doesn’t? Does lit citizenship require money? If you have it to spend in a literary way, great, but even if you don’t, you can still be a solid lit citizen and grow the community.”

Read the rest of the post at South85

So you think you’re too busy to write…

not according to this blog post by Leslie Pietrzyk, on the South85 blog. She writes:

“I know, I know. We’re all too busy to write. And yet…we’re writers. Write we must. But how? Here are some ideas for ways to try to keep your creative juices flowing when real life is getting in the way. Maybe you’ll feel like you’ve discovered that 25th hour of the day:”

Read the rest of this post–full of great suggestions on stealing writing time–at the South85 blog.

A Most Excellent Unwanted Dog Sestina, or Why I Heart National Poetry Month

Image Why yes, that is a picture of a picture of Leonard Nimoy and Jimi Hendrix. And what does this have to do with writing? With poetry? I wrote a poem about it, naturally. That’s how I roll. But seriously, I had been wanting to do something with this picture/idea since I first saw it back in January at  coffee shop in Tryon, NC. Nothing came to me until inspiration struck on day 29 of National Poetry Month when two prompts came together from poet Maureen Thorson’s NaPoWriMo site and Robert Lee Brewer’s Poetic Asides site. 

NaPoWriMo gave a prompt by Jim Simmerman called “Twenty Little Poetry Projects.” I love list/directions prompts, especially when they have instructions like this “2. Say something specific but utterly preposterous” and this “17. Make a declarative assertion that sounds convincing but that finally makes no sense.” This prompt was pretty much irresistible. I came up with lines like this “If you start at my left big toe, you can unpeel my skin like the devil peels a hard-boiled egg.” Yup. For whatever reason, I was thinking about spirals, like the grooves on a record, and then jumped to the image of Robert DeNiro peeling an egg in one, long strip in Angel Heart. Louis Cyphre indeed. Brewer’s prompt was more of a concept – write a magical poem and a realism poem, or a magical realism poem. I think I got a decent draft including both. 

This is the reason I love April. There are hundreds, thousands of poets at all stages of their craft participating in writing and stepping outside of themselves. When these poets post their drafts each day to sites like Brewer’s, to twitter with hashtags like #amwriting and #NaPoWriMo14, or to other social media sites, poetry becomes a shared community. Where else would I have been able to read the sestina “Tricked into a Pet” posted by cindikenn on day 13 at 8:46am with lines that really work like this “With three babies / born in three years and a furry bundle / of peeing wonder bound to be a dog, / lines often blurred between kid and pet”?

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, I don’t want to write in a vacuum. I don’t want my work to sit on a flashdrive in a drawer. No, I probably won’t be able to publish any of these poems because, to many, they have already been published. But wait! Thanks to NaPoWriMo’s day 28 “featured journal,” I found out about CSHS QuarterlyAnd they just published two of my NaPoWriMo poems. 

Look, this post is not meant to be a yay me! It is meant to show that community is a good thing. We should share our work. We should critique each other, applaud each others’ successes, share journals we find that we enjoy. It’s fun, and it’s part of what being a good literary citizen is all about. 

This is a shout out to Maureen Thorson, Robert Lee Brewer, and all you poets out there who attempted the poem-a-day challenge of this past April. Thanks for participating in the poetry community, and thanks for the inspiration. Write on!

Literary Citizen-and why you should be one #litcitizen

Lit Citizen-literary citizen. Loose definition—promoting others’ work over your own.

It’s a concept worth practicing—share others’ work instead of relentlessly promoting your own. But not just anyone’s work; share work you believe in.

*Read books and share the good stories, across all genres. Read, and then promote the work that you believe needs shared with the literary world.

*Support literary magazines through subscriptions if you can; but at the very least track down issues at a library, read, and then share the stories that resonated with you with others.

*Buy books and post reviews of the ones you believe need more readers.

*Support authors you enjoy by sharing their work and sending them a note of encouragement/appreciation.

Read more about literary citizenship at the Literary Citizenship blog.

Cathy Day teaches a class on literary citizenship at Ball State University. Check out their website and follow them on twitter.

Become part of the conversation. #litcitizen.

 

 

 

Writing Advice-Voice

Voice-as defined (sorta kinda) by wikipedia-states “The writer’s voice is the individual writing style of an author, a combination of idiotypical usage of syntax, diction, punctuation, character development, dialogue, etc., within a given body of text (or across several works).

For more thoughts on voice, check out these blog posts:
Ten Steps to Finding Your Writing Voice
How Can I Find My Writing Voice?
What Is Writer’s Voice?

Still Searching For My Voice

How To Craft a Great Voice

Develop voice by Listening

Finding A Voice

Know of any posts/articles/advice on voice? Post the links in the comments. (links not contributing to the discussion will be deleted)